News

Postgraduate summer course “Thinking About the Possible” at Central European University (CEU) in Budapest, Hungary, 9 July - 14 July, 2018

December 15, 2017

CEU’s summer program invites applications world-wide from early-career researchers, including PhD and MA students, and postdoctoral fellows. Undergraduates will not be considered.

THINKING ABOUT THE POSSIBLE 

CEU Summer School on "Creative Cognition: Evolutions, Processes, Applications"

January 2, 2017

We are happy to announce the next Summer University course

CREATIVE COGNITION: EVOLUTIONS, PROCESSES, APPLICATIONS

organized by Gunther Knoblich (Department of Cognitive Science, CEU, Hungary) and Penny Lewis (CUBRIC, University of Cardiff, UK);

held between 3-7 July, 2017 at Central European University, Budapest, Hungary

Application deadline: February 14, 2017

BRIEF COURSE DESCRIPTION

JAM VII will take place in Queen Mary University of London, UK from 22nd to 25th July, 2017

October 21, 2016

We invite you to attend the 7th bi-annual Joint Action Meeting (JAM) which brings together cognitive scientists and researchers from related disciplines studying individuals’ ability to act together.

Workshop on "Science Studies in Budapest"

October 10, 2016

The Science Studies program at CEU is organizing a one-day workshop entitled “Science Studies in Budapest”, in which invited researchers from Budapest working on the history, philosophy and social studies of science and technology will present their ongoing research. 

For more information visit the event page

New project at the Social Mind Center led by Christophe Heintz / Beliefs fostering dishonest behavior: Combining ethnographic and experimental evidence (BFD)

May 6, 2016

The project will investigate the factors that determine people's attitudes toward social rules or norms that are aimed at improving social welfare. Dishonesty can be characterized as failing to respect these rules, and adhering to them can be necessary for stable cooperation and resolving collective action problems. However, against this first operational characterization, ethnographic and experimental data suggest that depending on the context, people may break a rule and still think of themselves as honest.